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About Consilium

Consilium Academies is a multi-academy Trust working across the North of England. It has nine academy schools located in Yorkshire, the North West, and the North East. Consilium is dedicated to enriching lives and inspiring ambitions for both students and colleagues.

History

“We are not makers of History. We are made by History” - Martin Luther King Jr


At Ellesmere Park High School, our history curriculum should inspire students to be curious and ask questions of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. We want our students to think, read and speak like historians and to develop their cognitive skills to write as a historian. We want them to be independent learners using literacy to help them to understand the world they live in and become autonomous, deploying historically grounded understanding of terms such as peasantry, empire, and parliament.


We want our students to develop a chronological framework of British history that will enable them to make sense of the new knowledge they acquire. We want them to understand the process of change and to see how we arrived ‘here’ and help them make sense of the present. We want students to realise that the past is gone but history is constructed and contested and are able to use History’s unique second-order concepts to construct arguments and support them to become analytical citizens who can question human motivation and society with skill and confidence.


Our teaching will equip students with knowledge of people who live in societies that are and have been divided in different ways by wealth, class, gender, and race, understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims. This in turn will allow them to be inquisitive learners who will ask perceptive questions, view history from multiple perspectives and see connections between social, political, religious, and cultural history, as well as viewing history on different time scales.

5-Year History Curriculum overview, please see attachment below.
For more information about our History curriculum, please contact the Head of Department at rhian.fudge@concilium-at.com

Year 7

Term Focus Student Outcomes
Autumn 1
The Norman Conquest

 

Enquiry Question: How did the Battle of Hastings change England?

Students will:


Look at the importance of the French King taking power in England and the methods he had to put in place to maintain control of England such as Motte and Bailey Castles, Feudal System and the Doomsday Book.


Concepts studied: Invasion, Power, Control, Monarchy, Peasants.
Historical concepts: Significance, Change and Continuity.


Assessment skills: Source Inference question and analytical writing on significance.

Autumn 2
Medieval England 

 

Enquiry Question: Why was life so hard in Medieval England?

Students will:


Look at how hygienic towns were, crime and punishment and the position and role of the church and the consequences for not following the rules set out by the church.


Concepts studied: Power, Monarchy, Control, Crime and Punishment, Government, Church and religion, Disease


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence.


Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on causation.

Spring 1
Tudors

 

Enquiry Question: Why is the Tudor period described as a religious roller-coaster?

Students will:


Understand why Henry wanted to change the religion of the country from Catholic to Protestant. Looking at how his first daughter Mary changes the religion back to Catholic and the implications on her reign and the people of England. A detailed look at Elizabeth and her middle-way for religion and the war with Spain that occurred as a result of the religious tensions.


Concepts studied: Protestantism, Catholicism, Church, Religion, War, Power, Reformation, Monarchy.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity.


Assessment skills: Source utility question on a portrait and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Spring 2
English Civil War

 

Enquiry Question: Why did England execute their king?

Students will:


Investigate why the king and parliament went to war and understand the differences in the armies and the key battles. Students will understand the end result of the English Civil War and how that led to England becoming a republic.


Concepts studied: Protestantism, Catholicism, Church, Religion, War, Power, Parliament, Monarchy.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity.


Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on cause and consequence.

Summer 1
Stuarts

 

Enquiry Question: Was the new monarchy any better?

Students will:


Evaluate the role of the Stuart family once they are back in power. Looking at key events that framed the period such as witchcraft, the Great Fire of London. Students will investigate the reasons behind the Gunpowder Plot and the Great Plague.


Concepts studied: Religion, Power, Monarchy, Supernatural, Disaster


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence.


Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on significance.

Summer 2
Empire

 

Enquiry Question: Was the British Empire bad for everyone?

Students will:


Learn about the different countries that Britain ruled, India being the Jewel in the Crown of the British Empire. Students will investigate who the British Empire benefited as well as looking at the disastrous consequences for the indigenous people of the places that Britain controlled.


Concepts studied: Empire, Territory, Discrimination, Power and control, Government, Indigenous people, colonisation, Imperialisation, Nationalisation.
Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity.


Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Year 8

Term Focus Student Outcomes
Autumn 1
Industrial Revolution

 

Enquiry Question: Why was the Industrial Revolution a time of change for the country and its people?

Students will:


Learn about the change from the countryside to the city and how that led to a change in the living and working conditions for the people of Britain. Students will look at how these living and working conditions led to protest ranging from suffragettes to Chartists.


Concepts studied: Power, Reform, Protest, Living Conditions, Working Conditions, Politics, Campaign.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Autumn 2
The Transatlantic Slave Trade

 

Enquiry Question: Why did we make Africans slaves?

Students will:


Investigate life in Mali pre-slavery, life on board a slave ship, what a slave auction is like, living conditions on the plantations and the people who tried to abolish slavery. 

Concepts studied: Power, Economy, Invasion, Control, Slavery, Resistance, Rebellion, Discrimination.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Spring 1
Civil Rights in the USA
 
Enquiry Question: How did the fight for equality continue?
Students will:

Learn about the fight for Civil Rights in the USA from the 1920s and Jim Crow Laws to Montgomery Bus Boycott and Little Rock High School. Students will understand the constant fight for Civil Rights and the two main leaders Martin Luther King and Malcolm X and their different tactics used to gain progress in the fights for civil rights.

Concepts studied: Discrimination, Power, Politics, Government, Racism, Segregation.

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on significance.

Spring 2
Civil Rights in the UK
 
Enquiry Question: How have attitudes towards race in Britain changed in the last 60 years?
Students will:

Look at the same time period as the previous unit but this time in the UK. Students will understand the fight for Civil Rights and the discrimination suffered by black people in Britain. Students will earn about the arrival of people from the West Indies after WWI on MS Windrush followed by the problems experienced in Britain during the Brixton Riots, New Cross Fire and Stephen Lawrence murder.

Concepts studied: Discrimination, Politics, Government, Racism, Segregation, Power.

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Summer 1
World War I
 
Enquiry Question: Why were the troops not home by Christmas?
Students will:

Look at the long-term causes of WWI and the short-term causes, including the eventual trigger in the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Students will look at how they had to recruit more soldiers due to the fact that the war didn’t end at Christmas like they thought it would. Finally, we will look at why the Battle of the Somme was so devastating.

Concepts studied: Power, Empires, Militarism, Nationalism, Imperialism, War, Western Front, Propaganda.

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on cause and consequence

Summer 2
World War II
 
Enquiry Question: What was the Blitz Spirit?
Students will:

Students will look at the key battles in WWII such as Battle of Britain, the reasons why we were able to dominate the skies. Students will learn about the race against time to evacuate the soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk. Students will understand the changes on the Homefront and the work that people did to ensure the war continued abroad.

Concepts studied: War, Power, Dictatorship, Community.

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on significance.

Year 9

Term Focus Student Outcomes
Autumn 1
Interwar Years
 
Enquiry Question: How did Germany change under the Nazis?

Students will:


Understand the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the impact that had on Germany. Further to that students will look at the policy of appeasement adopted by Great Britain in response to Hitler. They will learn about the reasons why Hitler was voted into power and how he used propaganda to make people vote for him. Students will investigate how the Nazis tried to indoctrinate young children through school and Hitler Youth. They will look at how life changed for the people of Germany when Hitler took charge and how the Nazis used fear and intimidation to control the population.


Concepts studied: Power, Control, Dictatorship, Oppression, Opposition, Government, Race.

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Autumn 2 - Spring 1
Holocaust
 
Enquiry Question: What happened to the Greenman family?

Students will:


A focus on life for Jewish people pre holocaust getting students to realise that they were just like everybody else. Students will look at the persecution of Jewish people from the ghettos to concentration camps. Students will look at the collaborators, perpetrators and bystanders during the Holocaust and how each one contributed to the killing of millions of people. Students will continue to look at the Greenman family and how Leon survived the life after the concentration camps were liberated. Lastly a focus on remembrance of the Holocaust.


Concepts studied: Control, Racism, Religion, Race, Discrimination, Prejudice, Oppression, Anti-Semitism.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity
Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on significance and causation.

Spring 2
Genocide
 
Enquiry Question: Genocide: What is that?

Students will:


Looking at the various different genocides that have impacted upon the world. Student will look at the impact of the Armenian Genocide on the relationship between Armenians and Turkish people. Students will learn about the Cambodian genocide and the impact that the killing fields have o tourism in the country today. Students will understand the causes of the Bosnian genocide and the similarities to the Holocaust with concentration camps. Students will look at the Rwandan genocide looking at the impact that the Belgian colony had on the country in 1994.


Concepts studied: Power, Control, Dictatorship, Oppression, Opposition, Government, Race, Racism, Religion. 

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on cause and consequence.

Summer 1
Modern Warfare
 
Enquiry Question: How did wars change in the 20th Century?

Students will:


Students will understand how warfare has changed since the world wars. Students will look at the Cold War, a war that lasted for many years but never actually involved any armed conflict. Students will look at the Vietnam War and how the media presence changed the face of war and how far people supported a war. Students attentions will turn to the recent terrorist attacks, 9/11, 7/7 and the Manchester Arena bombing and how terror is a completely different type of warfare.


Concepts studied: Racism, War, Politics, Terrorism


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity.

Assessment skills: Source utility question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Summer 2
Migration
 
Enquiry Question: Why have people migrated through History?

Students will:


Learn about the movement of people across different countries. Students will focus on the Irish migration to America and the migration of people in the partition of India.


Concepts studied: War, Power, Politics, Persecution, Oppression.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Source inference question and analytical writing on change and continuity.

Year 10

Term Focus Student Outcomes
Autumn 1- Spring 1
Medicine Through Time
 
Enquiry Question: How has medicine changed over time?

Students will:


Students will look at medicine from medieval period through to the modern day. Students will understand the causes of illness in medieval Britain and how religion and superstition played a major role in the treatment of disease. Students will learn about the logical ideas of Galen but how the church hindered progress of medicine. Students will then move on to the Renaissance period, which was a time of scientific discovery. Students will discover the work of Vesalius, Harvey and Sydenham to improve medicine as well as the problem of the Great Plague. Students will learn about the dark period of surgery in the Industrial Revolution and how most people who went for an operation would die of infection. The Cholera epidemic will allow students to understand the way in which medicine stopped progressing. The students will then look at the development of technology in the modern period in the fight against diseases such as lung cancer. Students will also look at the impact our lifestyle choices have on our health. The unit finishes with a focus on medicine on the western front, looking at how advances in medicine came from the war.


Concepts studied: Medicine, Causes of illness, Treatment of illnesses, Disease, Government, Religion, War, Individuals, Science and technology, Communication.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Inference, Analytical writing, Source Utility, Analysing Interpretations.

Spring 2 - Summer 2
Nazi Germany
 
Enquiry Question: How did Hitler create a dictatorship in Germany?

Students will:


Study the Weimar Republic, the government set up at the end of WWI to govern Germany. Students will understand the challenges from Spartacists and Friekorps as well as the economic problems of hyperinflation and the intense dislike of the Treaty of Versailles. Students will learn about the golden age of the Weimar Republic, bolstered by the loans from the Dawes and Young plan and the new foreign treaties agreed by Chancellor Stresemann. Students will move on to look at how the Nazis manoeuvred themselves into the position of power. Students will learn about Hitler’s attempt to take power by violence through the failed Munich Putsch which ends in Hitler’s imprisonment. The course will then move on to Hitler establishing a party based on democracy and using the Wall Street Crash as a way of gaining votes on the road to chancellorship. Students will then understand the way in which Hitler turned Germany into a dictatorship and how he changed the lives of German people and started a campaign of persecution against minorities.


Concepts studied: Germany, Power, Democracy, Dictatorship, War, Chancellor, Foreign Policy, Economic Policy, Propaganda, Censorship, Control, Minorities.


Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity


Assessment skills: Inference, Analytical writing, Source Utility, Analysing Interpretations.

Year 11

Term Focus Student Outcomes
Autumn
Elizabethan England
 
Enquiry Question: What was the golden age of Elizabeth?

Students will:


Study the reign of Elizabeth. Looking at the problems she faced as a young queen, having to sort out the religion of the country and the debts inherited from her sister. Students will understand the role religion played in creating a constant threat to Elizabeth’s life due to the Catholics wanting to assassinate Elizabeth and putting Mary Queen of Scots on the throne, which is played out in the many plots against her life. Students will look at the rivalry between England and Spain, based primarily on religion which ultimately leads to the Spanish Armada. The last unit focuses on life in Elizabethan England, looking at the hobbies and sports played by the different classes and the emergence of theatre. They will study the different types of education on offer to young people in Elizabethan England. Students will also investigate the plight of the poor in Elizabethan society. The study moves on to the period of exploration and the different journeys undertaken by Sir Walter Raleigh.


Concepts studied: Power, Monarchy, Female, Religion, Government, Family, Marriage, Exploration, War, Society Poverty, Leisure. 

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Inference, Analytical writing, Source Utility, Analysing Interpretations.

Spring
American West
 
Enquiry Question: Was the west really wild?

Students will:


Start looking at the lives of the Native American Indians on the Great Plains of America, understanding the living conditions and how they used the buffalo for all their needs. Students will then start looking at the different people that moved west as it was their ‘manifest destiny’. The problems faced by the pioneers which led to many families dying on route, the problems the Mormons had in the east of America and their move to the west and setting up of Salt Lake City. The 69ers who moved west to make their fortune in the gold rush. The plans by the government to persuade people to move west to set up a homestead by luring them with offers of cheap land. Students will understand how the cow industry develops and the role in creating a wild west that was devoid of law and order. Students will understand the decline in the Indian way of life as a result of more people moving west.


Concepts studied: Native American Indians, Settlement, Relocation, Territory, War, Great Plains. 

Historical concepts: Significance, Cause and Consequence, Change and Continuity

Assessment skills: Inference, Analytical writing, Source Utility, Analysing Interpretations.

Summer
Revision
 
Students will:

Revise for their 3 exam papers.

Paper 1 – Medicine through Time and medicine on the Western Front.

Paper 2 – Elizabethan England and American West

Paper 3 – Nazi Germany.